York City Walls Walk – Step back in time

Bootham bar with York Minster behind

The historic city of York has barely changed throughout the years. During this time, the York City Walls have remained in a remarkable condition, almost intact centuries after they were first built and can now be walked, free of charge! Taking a stroll along the York Bar Walls (you’ll get to know more about this peculiar name later) is a must for both locals and tourists and certainly a great way to get to know more about the rich history of York.

The York Walls stand as the longest medieval town walls in England (they’re 3.4km or 2 miles long!), and also the best preserved. They can be accessed through four main and two secondary gates. But before we dwell on these, let me tell you all about the amazing history of the York City Walls.

Jump to The York City Walls Trail.

York city walls and York Minster

White rose of York emblem on York city walls gate

The original York Walls date back to 71 AD, when the city of York was erected as a Roman military fortress on the banks of the River Ouse and given the name Eboracum. With the Viking invasion of 866AD, the city was renamed Jorvik and the original Roman Walls were covered with dirt with a wooden palisade added to create an even stronger defensible shield. Some parts of the original Roman walls remain – such as the spectacular lower section of the Multangular Tower, which stands in the Museum Gardens, between the Yorkshire Museum and St Leonard’s Hospital.

York city walls near Walmgate bar

Roman walls, York

The fortress walls kept evolving throughout the centuries, strengthened and expanded with new additions from the successive Norman settlement (with the majority of the current walls dating back to the 13th century). Four fortified main entrances were erected at North, South, East and West points around York, known as “bars” for having barriers or barrières controlling the access to York. Additionally, a number of towers and secondary gates were also created. By the end of the 1700s, city officials applied to demolish the walls as they’d turned to ruin and were preventing York from expanding. Thankfully, this was met with strong opposition from residents and the York City Walls were never destroyed. Today, the York Walls are protected from the threat of demolition by being both a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a Grade 1 listed building.

1. Micklegate Bar

Meaning “Great Street”, Micklegate Bar is the main gateway to York from London and the South and was created in the 12th century. It was used as a Royal entrance for the King and Queen over the centuries (such as Edward IV, Richard III, Henry VII, James I and II, Charles I and Elizabeth II). In fact, you can currently explore the life of Henry VII through the “Henry VII Experience at Micklegate“! The Royal arms of England, France and the City of York can also be seen on the outer wall of Micklegate.

Micklegate bar - York, England

Did you know…? The severed heads and other body parts of traitors and rebels were spiked above Micklegate Bar as a warning, with victims including Richard of York, the 3rd Duke of York – who had a paper crown placed on his head -, Sir Henry Percy (Hotspur) and the Earl of Northumberland.

York city walls and Micklegate bar

2. Bootham Bar

The oldest of the four gateways to the city, Bootham Bar dates back to Roman times over 2,000 years ago. The oldest parts of the current gateway are from 11th and 12th centuries, with some stones of the original Roman structure almost certainly reused on Bootham Bar’s reconstruction.  In 1501 a knocker was added as Scots had to knock and have permission granted from the Lord Mayor to enter York. In 1835, the barbican was demolished, making Bootham Bar the final gate to lose its barbican.

Bootham bar, York

Looking through Bootham bar gateway, York

Did you know…? Bootham Bar is the closest of the gates to York Minster, with the City Walls between this and Monk Bar enclosing The Liberty of St Peter – a walled area where the Dean and Chapter of York Minster retained control with its own laws, courts and prison. It contained the Archbishop’s Palace and Cathedral, the Dean’s house, the Treasurer’s house (which can be still be visited up to this day), other houses of the Canons and the Precentor.

3. Walmgate Bar

Walmgate Bar is the most complete gateway of the York City Walls. The oldest section of the bar is an archway from the 12th century, which was originally part of a small gatehouse that sat on the site before stone walls were built to either side. The Walmgate Bar is also the only bar with a preserved barbican, a 14th century addition to the existing gate, which also had a portcullis (a barred gate with spikes) and 15th century wood gates. With a timber framed interior dating back to the Elizabethan period, Walmgate Bar also presents the Arms of Henry V on the outer side.

Walmgate bar - York, England

Walmgate bar inside city walls

Did you know…? People have lived in Walmgate Bar since before the 14th century and as recently as 1957! Also, there’s a hidden resident next to one of the windows – a cat statue! Cats have been part of York’s history and thought to bring luck since medieval times (they have 9 lives after all!). Originally, statues were placed on buildings to scare mice and rats away. Now, you can have fun trying to find them all following the York’s Lucky Cat Trail. There are a total of 22 cat statues scattered on rooftops, chimneys and windowsills of historic buildings all around York!

4. Monk Bar

Originally known as Monkgate Bar, this is the tallest and most ornate of the York City Walls bars. Built in the early 14th century, it owes its name to the monastic community that once lived on the site of the York Minster.

Although originally used as a house, this four-storey building was designed as a strong self-contained fortress easily defended from floor to floor, and features small rooms in the turrets to hold prisoners. Monk Bar still has a working portcullis with its original winding gear, which was used until 1970 and was lowered for the Queen’s coronation in 1953.

Monk bar - York, England

Did you know…? Monk Bar is currently home to the Richard III Museum. Here visitors can explore life of the last King of the Plantagenet dynasty through “The Richard III Experience at Monk Bar“.

Two small bars: Fishergate Bar and Victoria Bar

1. Fishergate Bar and Fishergate Tower

The first recordings of this secondary bar on the York City Walls date back to the early 14th century. An inscription commemorating William Todd, Lord Mayor of York knighted by Henry III in 1487, can be seen above the central arch. In return, he paid for the restoration work of 55 metres of the Bar Walls. However, just two years later, The Fishergate Bar entrance was damaged so badly in the Yorkshire Revolt against the heavy taxation imposed by Henry VIII that it remained blocked until 1827. Scorch marks from the Revolt can still be seen on the central arch!

Fishergate bar - York, England

Fishergate postern tower - York, England

Did you know…? Roman Catholics were imprisoned in the Fishergate towers above Fishergate Bar during the 16th and 17th centuries. Also, if you look up closely at the first floor of the Fishergate Tower, you can see a medieval toilet or “garderobe” with an external chute. Thankfully, this isn’t currently in use so it’s safe to stand underneath!

2. Victoria Bar

Victoria bar is a relatively recent addition to the York City Walls. Named after Queen Victoria, whose coronation took place in 1838 – the same year this gateway was built, its main purpose was to facilitate access between Bishopshill, inside the York Walls, and Nunnery Lane, on the outer side.

Victoria bar gateway - York, England

Did you know…? This isn’t the first bar on the site – the remains of the Lounelith Gate (meaning “hidden or obscure gate”) mentioned in 12th century documents were discovered underneath the grass rampart when the process to build Victoria Bar started!

Walking York city walls

Gateway to roman fortress marker

Clifford's Tower and Baile Hill marker, York City Walls

The York City Walls Trail

The York Walls walk offers fantastic views of the city, with a contrast from both sides of the wall. You can walk either way along the walls and access it through various points around York – either through the main and secondary bars or towers. The whole York City Walls trail takes approximately two and a half hours to walk. The route is also marked with small metal studs on the ground featuring a tower with battlements. As some parts of the City Walls aren’t complete, on each Bar are maps with indicators to help you follow the trail. Look out for other markers on the ground which highlight specific sections of the wall – such as the gateway to the Roman Fortress and Clifford’s Tower/Baile Hill.

York City Walls opening and closing times: 

  • The access gates open daily at 8am
  • The gates close at dusk, starting from Fishergate Bar in an anti-clockwise direction. The closing times vary between each month (from 3.30pm in winter to 9pm in summer), so make sure you check these before you start walking York City Walls!

What did you think of my York City Walls post? Have you walked the walls before? I hope this post has inspired you to visit this beautiful city and to walk these amazing walls full of history! If you liked our York Walls walk post, please leave us a comment, pin some photos and show us some love on social media using the buttons below 🙂

G. x


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32 comments

  1. Chloe

    I have never been to York but I know it has so much history to look at. Great pictures too :)x

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thanks Chloe! Oh York is amazing, you need to visit soon! x

      Reply

  2. Kat

    This is such an interesting post. I walked on the walls back in 2016, but I didn’t manage to walk the whole way. It was raining when I went 😀 I’ll definitely have to go back and do more exploring. I love history, so this is all like treasure for me!

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      This is amazing, thank you so much for the lovely comment Kat! I am happy you found my post useful and I really hope you can go back to York soon to continue exploring! x

      Reply

  3. Margarida Vasconcelos

    Beautiful pictures and lovely post. I so want to visit York but the train from London is so expensive. Thanks for sharing this.

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you for leaving a comment! I would suggest keeping an eye out for deals – our train tickets from London to York weren’t too expensive! x

      Reply

  4. Samuel Langley

    Some great photos on here and of course a great post talking about your experiences and the history behind your walk in York. 😄

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you so much for the comment, Samuel! I’m happy you enjoyed my post! 🙂

      Reply

  5. Zoe

    I liked your blog !! The images are beautiful!!

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you so much Zoe! x

      Reply

  6. becca

    Oh wow, that looks so cool! I’ve never been to York (I’ve never been outside the US!) but if I ever get the chance to visit England (and I hope I do!) this place would make the list.

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you Becca! I hope you get the chance to visit the UK soon and I would definitely recommend adding York to your UK bucket list! x

      Reply

  7. John Rieber

    An absolutely incredible tour…great photos and tons of interesting information…bravo!

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Woah thank you so much John, I’m really happy you liked my post!

      Reply

  8. Laura

    I’m not the greatest history nerd, but I can appreciate that York definitely looks gorgeous! On my travel list. I need to explore more places in UK!
    Laura / https://www.laustworld.com/

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you Laura! Hope you visit York soon! x

      Reply

  9. Brittany Vance

    I love your pictures and descriptions! It looks like a beautiful place to visit!

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you so much Brittany! x

      Reply

  10. Minifoxychicky

    Fantastic post and the pictures are great. I have never been to York but I love old places with such a rich history and the architecture is amazing. I will have to visit there myself one day.

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you for your comment! I’m so glad you liked my post and I hope you get to visit York one day! x

      Reply

  11. Ellyn Rebecca

    I went to university in Norwich, which also shares a lot of Early Modern History, and I loved seeing all the architecture from that time, and York is another example of that! I’ve never been to York, but I really want to go and will definitely put that on my list!

    Ellyn x | Life Of A Beauty Nerd

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Oh I definitely need to add Norwich to my bucket list! I’m glad you liked my York City Walls post Ellyn and I hope you get to visit soon! x

      Reply

  12. Jane Palmen

    Great post! I love York and have been there a couple of times but never walked the whole of the walls only part of them. The photos are amazing as is all the history you have shared. Hopefully I’ll get to go back and next time will do the whole of the wall circuit.

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you so much Jane! Definitely walk the whole of wall trail, it’s really interesting seeing how different each part is! x

      Reply

  13. Laura

    York is so gorgeous and this walk seems rather intriguing to do!

    – Laura || https://afinnontheloose.com

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Try it, I’m sure you’ll like it! x

      Reply

  14. Claire

    I haven’t been to York since I was a teenager but it is on the bucket list for this year. And I am glad to say reading this post has made me want to go even more. I will definitely be doing this walk x

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you so much for leaving a comment Claire! I hope you have a fun time visiting York this year! x

      Reply

  15. Kristin Harris/Tales From Home

    This is such a neat post! I love historic sites like this and hopefully someday can see it for myself! Your pictures are amazing!

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Wow thank you so much for the lovely comment Kristin! I really hope you visit soon! x

      Reply

  16. Blue DeBell

    Your pictures are amazing! This city looks breath taking! I will definitely have to add York to my travel list <3

    Reply

    1. blushrougette

      Thank you so much! x

      Reply

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